Hit the Pavement, Avoid Injury

With the weather turning warmer and warmer, the joy of taking an outdoor run is here. Taking in the fresh spring air and hitting the pavement or trail has never felt more freeing. Before venturing out, though, be sure to think ‘safety first’ in order to enjoy those runs well into the summer and fall. Here are some important precautions to follow from Healthline.com*:

  • Don’t wear headphones when running on roads. You need to be able to hear traffic around you and remain aware of your surroundings.
  • Run against traffic.
  • Follow all rules of the road. Look both ways before crossing a street.
  • Run in well-lit, safe areas. Wear reflective gear in the early morning or evening hours.
  • Bring water with you when you run, or run on a route with water available, so you can stay hydrated as you train.
  • Carry identification with you when you run. Tell a friend, roommate, or family member where you’re going.
  • Run with a family member or dog, when possible.
  • Wear sunscreen when running outdoors.
  • Run in loose, comfortable clothing and appropriate running shoes.
  • Switch out your running shoes every 300 to 500 miles.
  • Warm up before running and stretch afterward.
  • Cross-train once or twice per week to mix up your routine and keep your muscles challenged.

Should you find yourself in the unfortunately position of having an injury, be sure to pay attention to your body. Rest and seek medical attention if necessary. The skilled physicians at Northeast Orthopedics and Sports Medicine are here to provide treatment and get you back out on the road. Find the office nearest to you at neosmteam.com/locations.

*Source: https://www.healthline.com/health/average-mile-time#precautions

NEOSM Resumes Elective Surgery

We’re pleased to share that restrictions on elective surgery in our area have been lifted and all NEOSM surgical locations are now cleared for surgery. The team of skilled orthopedic surgeons at NEOSM are prepared to provide the surgical needs of our patients while maintaining the highest level of safety precautions.

Scheduling surgery

  • If you had a surgery scheduled and it was postponed, the NEOSM team will be contacting you to reschedule your procedure.
  • If you have recently seen one of our doctors and were indicated for surgery but did not schedule, please call your doctor’s surgery coordinator to schedule your procedure.
  • If you believe you need surgery, but have not scheduled a date previously, please call one of our offices for an appointment.

Please feel free to contact us with any questions.

Sincerely,

Northeast Orthopedics & Sports Medicine

6 Helpful Tips to Stay Active at Home

The benefits of physical activity are undeniable. Consistent exercise helps reduce your health risks,
strengthen your bones and muscles, and even reduce feelings of anxiety. With many gyms and exercise facilities currently closed, here are a few easy tips to help you stay active from home.

  • Set an intention for the day
    When you rise in the morning, set your goal for physical activity for the day. However big or small, identifying what exactly you’d like to accomplish will make it more likely for you to achieve it. It could be as simple as “I will take the dog for a 20-minute walk”, or more challenging like committing to a 40-minute workout. It’s up to you, just let yourself know and plan your day accordingly.
  • Take advantage of free resources
    If you have WiFi, you have access to a huge library of workouts for all fitness levels. YouTube is a great resource, and many home workout apps are offering free content, like Peloton, Nike and Planet Fitness. And it’s always free to go outside! Adding some fresh air to your physical activity helps clear your mind and connects you to the world around you.
  • Find a partner
    It’s easier to achieve your goals if you have a partner to motivate you and keep you accountable.
    Maybe someone in your home can join you on your walks, or you can text your friend your morning goals and have them check in on you. Any way you choose, having support makes all the difference.
  • Practice safety
    Aside from safe social distancing practices, make sure you take all the necessary safety precautions during your activity, like wearing your helmet during your bike ride, warming up your muscles before your workout and practicing good form when lifting heavyweights. You’ll hear many workout instructors advise you to substitute hand-held weights with household items. If you do, make sure to choose wisely and avoid items that could slip your grasp and cause an injury. Simply, be careful and move smartly to minimize your risks.
  • Don’t ignore an injury
    Be mindful not to aggravate a potential injury further. It’s common to feel muscle fatigue and soreness after a strenuous workout, but if you are experiencing acute pain or pain that won’t go away, you may need to be evaluated. The physicians at NEOSM are available for telemedicine appointments and our offices are open for necessary in-person visits. Don’t wait for an injury to get worse – we can accommodate same-day or next-day appointments, just call any of our offices to schedule.
  • Be kind to yourself
    The motivation you have today may not be the motivation you had yesterday and that’s ok! Be kind to yourself and commit to even the smallest amount of physical activity to help get your blood flowing. You never know, once you get moving, you may feel inspired to do more!

We hope these tips have inspired you to set your activity goals and get moving. Stay safe and stay healthy.

What to do if you get hurt during COVID-19

By: Dr. Doron Ilan

It is distressing enough to get hurt during normal times, but getting hurt during the COVID-19 pandemic can cause immense additional stress and fear. What should one do if injured during this difficult time?
Should I go to the ER and risk being infected with Coronavirus? Should I go to urgent care? I have heard there are a lot of coronavirus cases there too. Should I go to my doctor’s office? Are they open? Is it safe?


First of all, you should get medical care for your injury. We see that many patients are not getting the care they need because they are afraid to leave the house or go to a medical facility. This is turning injuries that could be treated easily right away into more serious conditions. If you are seriously injured (crooked limb, excessive bleeding, head injury, etc), without question, you should call 911 and go to the ER. Otherwise, there are probably better options. The first step would be to call your doctor’s office (primary care or specialist depending on the condition) and see if they are available to see you. If they are unavailable, an urgent care office is probably your best option. You should avoid visiting the ER unless you are seriously injured, as most are currently overwhelmed.


If you have an Orthopedic injury or develop a musculoskeletal condition, Northeast Orthopedics and Sports Medicine is available to treat your condition in a safe environment. We are open for Orthopedic Urgent Care, regular in-person office visits, and Telemedicine visits with onsite x-ray and ultrasound. Your safety is our priority. Many patients can be seen from the comfort of their home via Telemedicine, and for in-office visits, we have taken significant steps to keep you safe in all of our offices including: limiting the number of patients and staff in the office; prescreening patients for any signs of illness or contact with coronavirus – and keeping them away from the office; separating waiting room chairs; providing the opportunity to wait in your car until your doctor is ready for your visit; providing the option to fill out forms online prior to visiting; offering minimal wait times to see a doctor; ensuring all staff are in proper Personal Protective Equipment (masks, etc); wiping down/sanitizing all patient areas after each patient; making certain all staff sanitize hands before and after each patient; requiring all patients to wear a face-covering; making hand sanitizer available throughout offices; providing priority scheduling (first hour of day) for older patients and immunocompromised patients, and restricting office to the patient only (unless a minor or disabled patient who can bring one parent or aide).


To see one of our specialists, please call any of our offices and you will be given the option to be seen the same or next day in the office or via telemedicine. Stay safe!

What is Telemedicine? We answer your questions.

While our nation confronts the spread of the coronavirus, Northeast Orthopedics and Sports Medicine (NEOSM) is now offering Telemedicine appointments to continue our commitment to provide exceptional care for our patients and community. Although Telemedicine has been around for years, the recent COVID19 pandemic has taken Telemedicine from a rarely used mode of seeing your doctor to a necessity of social distancing. With Telemedicine, you have access to NEOSM’s team of orthopedic specialists from the comfort of your home. 

What exactly is Telemedicine? And what can you expect from your virtual appointment? Here are some answers to commonly asked questions. 

What is Telemedicine?

Telemedicine allows for patients to be evaluated, diagnosed and treated by a physician through video conference. By using this technology, Telemedicine allows access to care when an in-person visit is not the preferred option. This is very similar to common apps like FaceTime, but Telemedicine applications are typically HIPPA compliant and may have other features that assist in a patient visit, such as digital waiting rooms, ability to review xray/MRI images, integration with home blood pressure monitor, etc.

Why choose Telemedicine?

Several studies have shown that in many cases a Telemedicine visit is as good as an in-person visit.  While there are some elements of a physical exam that cannot be done via video, many of the elements can still be performed.  Under normal circumstances there are many benefits of Telemedicine to the patient including convenience, but during COVID19 the benefits are immense and critical to getting healthcare to the patients who need it most and who are at highest risk from COVID19. 

Do I need special equipment or technology to use Telemedicine?

All that is required is a computer, tablet or smartphone with a camera and microphone enabled. No software is needed to be downloaded and you don’t need to create an account. 

How do I make a Telemedicine appointment? 

Call any one of our locations and our staff will schedule your virtual appointment. 

I have made a Telemedicine appointment with NEOSM, what do I do next?

Prior to your appointment, NEOSM will email or text to you a ‘doxy.me’ link. At the time of your appointment, just click on the link. The first time you enter, you will be prompted to allow doxy.me access to your camera and microphone. After doing so, enter your FULL name to check-in. You’ll then enter the virtual waiting room and the doctor will be notified you have arrived. That’s it! As soon as the doctor is ready, they will start your visit. 

Does insurance cover Telemedicine visits?

Telemedicine visits are covered by insurance as a regular doctor’s visit. Co-pays, referrals, etc. would apply as normal. Some insurance companies have waived copays during the Covid-19 pandemic for telemedicine visits. Please contact your carrier for more information.

What if an in-person visit is necessary?

If during your Telemedicine appointment the doctor determines that an in-person visit is necessary, we will have you schedule an appointment in one of our offices. Please note, NEOSM is taking many precautions to make sure our patients are as safe as possible when visiting our offices, like minimizing the number of patients in our waiting rooms and increased disinfecting of surfaces, to name a few. 

If you have additional questions on Telemedicine or would like to schedule your appointment, please call our offices and we’d be happy to help!

COVID-19: NEOSM Patient Safety Measures

To our patients:

As dedicated healthcare professionals, all of us at Northeast Orthopedics and Sports Medicine (NEOSM) are committed to the health and well-being of our patients, staff and community. During the current spread of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) in our area, our focus on safety is even more paramount. We have taken the following measures to ensure that all those in need of immediate orthopedic care are able to be consulted while limiting unnecessary exposure to others. 

Visitor Policy:

All NEOSM offices, except for Pomona, are open during regular hours for orthopedic appointments for patients who need to be seen in person. Priority scheduling (first hour of day) is available for older patients and those immunocompromised. Only the patient is permitted to enter our offices. If the patient requires assistance or a parent (for minors), the accompanying visitor must be in good health. All patients and visitors are required to wear a face-covering.

All visitors are pre-screened for any signs of illness or contact with coronavirus. Those who do not pass our pre-screening will be restricted from our office. All non-essential visitors are not permitted. 

In-Office:

We are limiting the number of patients and staff in each office. In our waiting rooms, we have separated chairs to allow proper distancing and are providing the opportunity to wait in your car until your doctor is ready for your visit. We are also providing the option to fill out forms online prior to visiting and minimal wait times to see a doctor.

All staff are in proper Personal Protective Equipment (masks, etc) and all staff sanitized hands before and after each patient. All patient areas are wiped down/sanitized after each patient. Hand sanitizer is available throughout our offices for use.

Telemedicine Appointments (Virtual):

We are offering all patients the opportunity to consult with our physicians virtually through telemedicine appointments. Just call our office as you would to make a regular appointment and this option will be available. A web link will be sent to you to access the virtual appointment. All you need is either a smartphone, tablet or computer, with a camera and the microphone enabled. Telemedicine appointments are covered by insurance as a regular visit and all referrals, etc, would remain the same.  Click here to learn more about Telemedicine.

We will continue to monitor the evolving situation and regulations in place during this time. We encourage you all to continue to practice social distancing, regular hand washing and sanitizing, and to remain up-to-date on and adhere to your local guidelines. 

Thank you and stay safe. 

Northeast Orthopedics & Sports Medicine

Updated April 2020

Which approach is right for your hip?

By: Dr. Barry Kraushaar

When a patient has arthritis of the hip, there really are only a few choices available for treatment. Most people try to ignore pain or live with it as long as they can.  Once daily life is affected, it becomes necessary to discuss other options. 

The non-operative care of the arthritic hip is rather limited. Options include:

  • Oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) pills. 
    • These can help briefly, but they do not address the underlying problem, and they can cause bleeding, ulcers, kidney disease and high blood pressures,
  • Physical therapy 
    • This may help especially if there are surrounding thigh and low back issues
  • Hip joint injections 
    • Cortisone may briefly help
  • Less traditional measures 
    • Acupuncture, topical ointments and rubs, chiropractic care, prolotherapy, stem cell treatments, etc., though these are not proven to work by scientific standards

For those patients who do not improve with conservative measures, hip replacement surgery may be necessary. When this decision is made, a patient has two general choices about the surgical approach to the hip: Anterior or Posterior

  • Anterior hip replacement – this procedure is done with the patient lying face upward on the table. A special table may (or may not) be used to help the surgeon optimize the procedure. The approach allows the use of a video-type fluoroscope imaging system which permits real-time optimization of the process of implanting the joint. The surgery is performed by entering the hip between muscles, and no muscle is cut in the process. This procedure is optimal for some patients – ask your surgeon. Some patients report a more rapid return to walking and activities after the anterior approach – compared to the posterior approach. Also, after this approach there is no restriction to bending over, and patients are not required to follow “hip precautions” as is necessary in the posterior approach. Some patients feel the anterior approach is less painful in the early post-operative time period.
  • Posterior hip replacement – this approach has been the more traditional method, and the duration of a routine case may be a bit shorter than the anterior approach. The posterior approach does not require any special table to perform. It is “tried and true” and some surgeons perform only this procedure because it is so reproducibly good that they prefer to stay with it exclusively. The posterior approach involves crossing some fine-control muscles on the way into the hip joint. The ligaments in the rear of the hip are opened, so after the procedure is done, patients need to observe hip precautions, usually for three months. They are not allowed to bend past 90-degrees and should sleep with a pillow between the knees, among other restrictions. The fluoroscope cannot be used real-time during the case, but plain x-rays can be taken during the case to confirm that components are going in correctly. The posterior approach is felt by some surgeons to be best in difficult cases because it is easier to manage difficulties (such as a stress fracture) from this direction.

By 6 weeks most patients with either approach are doing similarly well. Infection rates are similarly low. Dislocation rates are slightly less with the anterior replacement according to some reports. Blood thinners are used in the same manner postoperatively for either approach.

Northeast Orthopedics and Sports Medicine has surgeons who perform both the anterior and posterior approaches to hip replacement. We are happy to answer your questions, so contact us today to schedule your consultation.

Is Rehab Right For You?

By: Dr. Barry Kraushaar

Many patients who see an Orthopedic Surgeon arrive with a concern that the prescription for treatment is surgery. The fact is, surgery is a small part of the entire care of an orthopedic patient. While it is true that a surgeon may need to perform procedures to repair some injuries, there is an important role for Physical and Occupational Therapy in all the phases of patient care.

Many patients have discomfort due to muscle imbalances. These can be recently acquired, or they can be developing over decades.

  • Physical therapy is prescribed to assess as well as treat these imbalances. The field of Sports Medicine has been helpful in showing us the benefit of strength-balancing to restore function. The fact is, most patients with shoulder pain can be treated with this approach. A person can have a rotator cuff tendon tear or shoulder instability, yet they may avoid surgery if the remaining muscles are properly rehabilitated. Rehab takes time. With the supervision of a therapist a patient can be moved forward in a manner tailored to that specific person’s pattern of injury.

In order to rehabilitate properly, a patient must be comfortable enough to perform the exercises.

  • This is where the modalities of PT matter. Massager, electrical stimulation, TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) and ice/heat combinations are examples of comfort measures. Some patients need a gradual approach to rehab, and modalities are very helpful in the immediate postoperative period before exercises can begin.

Stiffness can be a separate category of difficulty that the therapist may need to address.

  • Muscle imbalances do not always explain loss of function. Sometimes stiffness is a separate issue that takes time to manage. A physical therapist can not only teach stretching, but they also can help the patient perform them. This can be especially true in patients with chronic shoulder or knee pain. The posterior (rear) position of the shoulder gets tight in some shoulders, especially baseball pitchers. The hamstrings tend to tighten up in patients with chronic knee pain. Therapists know to address this category of rehabilitation in addition to strength and comfort.

You are your own best friend in Rehabilitation.

  • The goal of Physical or Occupational therapy is to restore your function as close as possible to your pre-injured state. With your own participation the results are more likely to work. A good therapist will teach you techniques that you can use, and provide you with home exercises to make the improvements last.

Not everyone needs rehabilitation, and there is eventually a limit to the benefits achieved. The purpose of an Orthopedic Surgeon prescribing rehabilitation is to address the injured part and the surrounding region. So if your doctor prescribes therapy, there is probably a good reason for it.

Contact us today to speak to a Northeast Orthopedics & Sports Medicine physician to discuss how therapy may fit into your treatment plan.