Preparing Your Home for Knee Replacement

Knee replacement surgery can really be life-changing. Eventually, majority of patients are able to resume daily activities with considerable less pain and discomfort. Before and immediately after surgery, it’s important to follow your physician’s instructions carefully to avoid unnecessary setbacks. One key direction from our surgeons is to create a home environment focused around healing and recovery before your scheduled procedure to help set you up for success. The American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons recommends you consider the following to prepare your home for your return.

Arrange for help at home from a family member, friend or caregiver for days or weeks after surgery.

Clear or arrange furniture so you can easily make your way with a cane, walker or crutches.

Plan for avoiding stairs. Consider moving your sleeping quarters downstairs, if you are able.

Remove any tripping hazards. Throw rugs or area rugs, electrical cords and clutter, for example, can be dangerous during recovery.

Make sure you have a good chair with a high seat and a footstool for elevation.

Have a shower chair and gripping bar set up in the bathroom.

Set up a “recovery center” – an area where everything you need most often are at your fingertips, like a table by your chair with your medications, tissues, water pitcher, phone, etc.

These simple planning steps not only provide a safe environment for your recovery, but they also grant you a huge amount of peace-of-mind, which you’ll appreciate once you are discharged.

If you have any questions about these tips, or knee replacement surgery in general, give us a call, the specialist at Northeast Orthopedics and Sports Medicine would be happy to provide answers.

Shoulder Pain? All About Shoulder Osteoarthritis Treatment

NEOSM’s Dr. Jason Fond presents everything you need to know about the treatment of shoulder osteoarthritis in a sit down with Montefiore Nyack Hospital.

Click on the video below to watch the presentation.

If you are suffering shoulder pain, the specialist at Northeast Orthopedics and Sports Medicine are here to help. Reach out for a consultation today.

6 Signs You Should See an Orthopedic

“Should I get this checked out?” That’s the question most of us ask ourselves when we’ve suffered an injury or have been experiencing some ongoing discomfort. It’s hard to know what you can let heal on its own and what needs the attention of a specialist. Consider, though, that waiting on treatment can create deeper issues and complications. To help, our orthopedics are sharing the tell-tale signs that it’s time for them to take a look.

Pain, Swelling, Discoloration, Loss of Motion Lasting More Than 48 Hours

Things don’t feel or look normal, and they don’t seem to be getting better.

Deformity 

Your joint or extremity is looking deformed, for instance a finger that is now crooked.

Locked Joint 

You have lost range of motion in a joint, such as your elbow, shoulder or knee.

Any Bone or Joint Injury with Broken Skin 

An open wound or break in the skin is visible in the area of the injured bone.

Over-the-counter Pain Medication Not Providing Relief

You’ve tried Tylenol or ibuprofen, but your pain has not been reduced to a tolerable level.

Unable to Bear Weight 

Standing or walking is painful, or nearly impossible

Any of the symptoms above could be a sign of a serious orthopedic issue that could get worse if not treated. If you think you, or someone you know, is in need of a consultation, reach out for an appointment with one of our highly trained specialists today. 

Is Knuckle Cracking Bad?

By: Doron Ilan, MD

Between 25-50% of people will crack their knuckles at some point.  In some of these people it becomes habitual. Parents across the world have been telling their kids (and spouses) “Don’t crack your knuckles. You are going to get arthritis!” Is this true? What is actually happening when someone cracks their knuckles? 

What happens when you crack your knuckles?

Our knuckle joints (metacarpo-phalangeal joints) are synovial joints. Meaning there are two cartilage covered bones that meet each other and are surrounded by a joint capsule which contains synovial fluid (lubricant). When our joints move normally the synovial fluid lubricates the ultra-smooth cartilage and the bones glide silently over each other. When someone pops their knuckle, the pressure exerted on the joint and synovial fluid forces dissolved gases out of the synovial fluid. This creates what is called a cavitation bubble. This forms very quickly and explosively. This cavitation bubble then pops. It is believed that the sound of knuckle cracking is due to the formation or popping of the cavitation bubble. This would be similar to either the opening of a champagne bottle (sound caused by formation of the bubbles) or popping bubble wrap (sound caused by popping the bubble). To this day, we are still not 100% sure which one it is. The thing we are sure about is that knuckle popping is not due to bone rubbing on bone or tendons popping.

Are all sounds coming from a joint due to gases?

No. In arthritis (loss of cartilage) you can get a crunching sound called crepitus as bone rubs on bone. Some people have loose joints and the joint can sublux or partially dislocate. A tendon can shift over a moving joint and cause a pop or clunk. A torn labrum (hip or shoulder) or meniscus (knee) can also cause popping in a joint. Note:  If you have pain associated with any noise from a joint you should consult your doctor.   

Is knuckle cracking bad for you? Does it cause arthritis?

This may come as a shocker to parents everywhere but there is no evidence that knuckle cracking is bad for you or causes arthritis. It is certainly annoying and there have been case reports where people tried to crack their knuckles with such force that they caused a sprain or fracture, but despite multiple studies it appears that routine knuckle cracking is safe. There was even one doctor (Donald Unger) who decided to do a study on himself. He cracked the knuckles on one of his hands for 50 years while not cracking the other. He found no difference between the two hands in the end.  

So go ahead and crack your knuckles.  Just don’t do it around me. 

For more from the experts at Northeast Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, feel free to contact us for a consultation.

Robotic Knee Replacement: Everything you need to know

NEOSM’s Dr. Jordan Simon recently sat down with Montefiore Nyack Hospital to share all you need to know about robotic knee replacement surgery. This advancement in medical technology helps guide skilled surgeons to ensure positive patient outcomes.

Click on the video below to watch the presentation.

At Northeast Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, our physicians are leaders in their fields and continually apply the latest technological advances in medicine to their care. To find out more, contact us today.

Hudson Valley Top Doctors 2020

We are immensely proud to announce the NEOSM physicians named to Hudson Valley magazine’s list of Top Doctors for 2020. The providers at Northeast Orthopedics and Sports Medicine are dedicated to providing exceptional, compassionate care to our community every day. Congratulations to the following doctors recognized for excellence in their fields. Thank you for being the best of the best!

Orthopedic Surgery

Kenneth Austin, MD
Marc Berezin, MD
William Davis Jr, MD
Barry Kraushaar, MD
Mark Medici, MD
Patrick Murray, MD
Steven Renzoni, MD
Richard Semble, MD
Jordan Simon, MD

Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

Michael Robinson, MD

Rheumatology

Shivani Purohit Mehta, MD

Sports Medicine

Richard Popowitz, MD

Congratulations to you all! If you’d like to make an appointment for consultation with one of our talented physicians, please call an office near you.

At-Home Relief for Tight Hamstrings

Did you know lower back pain, hip and knee issues, poor posture and other problems can be associated with tight hamstrings? The hamstrings are a group of three muscles located in the back of the thigh. When these muscles are tight, or inflexible, they can cause discomfort beyond pain in the immediate area.  If it’s difficult to touch your toes without bending your knees, either from standing or when seated on the floor, you may be suffering from tight hamstrings. So what can you do to feel some relief?

Prevention

A common cause of tight hamstrings is being in a seated position for prolonged amounts of time. Too much sitting means your hamstrings are constantly flexed, so it’s important to give those muscles a chance to elongate. Take breaks to stand up, walk around or do some stretching.

Equally important is the time you give to stretching before and after you exercise. Proper warm up and cool down of your hamstrings can prevent injury.

Stretches

Consistent stretching is a great way to relieve tight hamstrings. Here are some stretches to try at home.

  • Simple Hamstring Stretch

Seated on the floor with both legs straight out, reach forward while bending at the hip towards your toes, being careful not to overly round your back. Hold for up to 30 seconds.

  • Hamstring Stretch with Strap

While lying flat on the floor, place a strap or towel around the bottom of your foot, hold on to each end in your hands. Slowly extend your leg so the bottom of your foot is raised towards the ceiling while keeping your knee straight. Your other leg should be extended on the ground. Hold for up to 30 seconds. Repeat with your other leg.

  • Standing Hamstring Stretch

While standing, cross one foot over the other. Bend at the waist and slowly lower your upper body toward your knees, careful not to bend your knees. Hold for up to 30 seconds. Repeat on the other side.

It’s always key to listen to your body. If you are experiencing prolonged pain, it may be a sign of a more serious issue. Contact us to meet with one of our orthopedic specialists for a consultation.