NEOSM Annual Backpack Drive

Once again, NEOSM has had the honor to support the amazing team at the East Ramapo Central School District Family Resource Center by providing school supplies and backpacks for the children of our community. Our physicians and employees contributed a countless number of back-to-school basics that are necessary for the students in our area to succeed. We wish all of them a wonderful year full of learning! 

A special THANK YOU to the ERCSD Family Resource Center for all that they do throughout the year!

You’ve torn your ACL, now what?

By: Dr. Barry Kraushaar

The diagnosis of a torn ACL can be scary for any athlete. Fortunately, you can get back to your sport with proper evaluation and treatment. Here’s a better understanding of what you may be dealing with and your options.

Your knee is a hinge-type joint that is held together by ligaments. In the center of the knee are the Posterior (rear) and Anterior (front) Cruciate Ligaments (PCL and ACL). Together, these cables of collagen stabilize the knee when you pivot or perform sports. Unfortunately, the ACL is often vulnerable to tearing suddenly during a pivot/twist maneuver, making ACL tears a common sports injury. When an ACL tear occurs, a decision needs to be made about whether to live with a torn ligament, to repair it or to replace the ligament. It depends on patient function and future needs.

  • Living with a torn ACL: Some patients choose to live with a torn ACL. For younger people, it may not be advisable to live a lifetime with this ligament torn. Although in some cases the ACL ligament can scar onto the PCL and act stable, more often instability occurs and it should not be ignored. An unstable knee can develop secondary damage, such as meniscus cartilage tears, and over time this can result in early-onset arthritis.  For those who do not sense instability, an ACL-deficient knee may be treated with rehabilitation and a brace. A custom designed brace will fit more closely. When a knee already has arthritis, an ACL reconstruction may not only be unnecessary, but the surgery may actually “Capture” the knee and hasten the worsening of arthritis.
  • Repairing the ACL: Because the ACL ligament tends to spread into separate strands like a torn rope when it ruptures, a simple repair of this ligament is rarely possible. The torn remnant is usually rolled up or shortened and it is hard to make it attach to the place on the femur bone from where it usually detaches. On rare occasions, it may be possible to perform a micro-surgical repair of your own ligament and keep your own structure.
  • Reconstruction of the ACL:  The most common treatment for a torn ACL in an adult who has no arthritis is to replace the ligament. A replacement can be strong and long enough to bridge the area of ACL detachment. The ligament is routed through the center of the knee and fixed to the bones above and below so that it acts similar to the original. The success rate of this procedure is high, but not 100%.  
    • For older and less active patients, cadaver ligament graft can be used. It is less painful and has a quicker recovery, but there are reports that the failure rate is higher than using your own graft material.
    • For younger, active patients, the best success rates are achieved if you use your own Patellar tendon (in front of the knee), Hamstring or Quadricep tendons on the inner part of the knee. The outcomes of these graft types are similar, so your surgeon may have preferences based upon their experience.
  • Rehabilitation from ACL surgery is individual for every patient but most cases finish doctor-supervised acre after three months. Return to sports occurs as late as nine months, depending on the type of activity.

ACL reconstruction techniques and methods are still evolving. The fellowship-trained Sports Medicine specialists at Northeast Orthopedics and Sports Medicine keep up with current trends and bring the latest treatment to you. If you’ve experienced a ligament tear, contact us to meet with our physicians and discuss treatment options available for you. 

If you do encounter an ACL or other orthopedic injuries, contact us today to find out what’s wrong and how we can help.

Preventing Gardening Injuries

For most of us who enjoy gardening, it is a relaxing, safe hobby.  However, every year we see many people who are needlessly injured in their backyards. Nationally more than 400,000 gardening injuries are seen in the ER every year.

By: Dr. Doron Ilan

For most of us who enjoy gardening, it is a relaxing, safe hobby.  However, every year we see many people who are needlessly injured in their backyards. Nationally more than 400,000 gardening injuries are seen in the ER every year. Back injuries, hand lacerations/puncture wounds, infections, overuse tendinitis, bug bites, and heat exhaustion are some of the more common medical conditions seen in recreational gardeners. Here are a few tips to keep you safe this spring and summer.

  • Warm up: One of the most common mistakes is to head straight to the shed and start lifting heavy bags of mulch, soil, and equipment. This can lead to back sprains and muscle strains.  Instead, first, take a 5-10 brisk walk to warm up the muscles, loosen the joints and get the heart rate up a bit.
  • Wear gloves: This will prevent most thorn punctures, blisters, lacerations, and bug bites. It will also protect your skin from pesticides, bacteria, and fungus (often live in soil). A small cut can lead to a major infection. A light long sleeve shirt and long socks or pants can’t hurt either.  Don’t forget the sunscreen and a hat.
  • Hydrate: It is very easy to spend hours gardening without drinking. Bring a bottle of water outside with you and sip regularly
  • Rotate your tasks: Avoid overuse repetitive stress injuries by not spending more than 10-15 minutes in a row doing the same motion. Make sure your gardening activities are varied so that the same muscles are not used repetitively.
  • Use proper equipment
  • Check your skin for ticks after you finish gardening for the day. Lyme disease and other tick-borne infections are very common in our area.

Following these tips can help minimize your risk, but of course, if you do sustain an injury make sure to get medical attention as soon as possible.  Have a great spring and summer — and enjoy your gardening!

If you do encounter an orthopedic injury while gardening, contact us today to find out what’s wrong and how we can help.

The Most Common Types of Shoulder Pain, Explained

The shoulder is an efficient combination of joints, muscles and tendons that enable a wide variety of movement and range of motion. However, its utility and versatility make the shoulder prone to a variety of injuries and conditions. In fact, shoulder pain will affect up to 70 percent of the population in their lifetime. It can be disabling and result in a host of unwanted consequences.

Below are some of the most common painful shoulder conditions:

Biceps Tendinitis

The biceps tendon is a structure that connects the biceps muscle to the humerus (upper arm bone) bone near the shoulder joint. Biceps tendinitis, a common cause of shoulder pain, is an irritation or inflammation of the upper part of the tendon.

Causes

Often, biceps tendonitis is due to wear and tear. It can also be connected to other shoulder issues, such as instability, shoulder impingement or a rotator cuff injury. It is particularly associated with damage to the rotator cuff tendon.

Repeated motion in work or sport—particularly those activities that require overhead motion, such as construction work, painting, swimming, tennis and baseball—can also cause biceps tendinitis.

Treatments

  • Rest (from overhead activity)
  • Ice
  • Medication
  • Physical therapy
  • Steroid injections

Surgery-If more conservative measures have been exhausted, surgery may be indicated. This may entail biceps tenodesis, which is detaching the tendon from the shoulder socket and reattaching it to the upper arm bone.

Rotator Cuff Tear

The rotator cuff is involved every time you move your shoulder. It helps to stabilize the shoulder. So, it stands to reason that it is a commonly injured area. Rotator cuff tears can either be partial or incomplete (a tear that is frayed), or complete, which entails a tear that goes completely through the tendon.

Causes

There are two main causes of rotator cuff tears. They can occur from an acute injury (such as a fall or other cause of severe twisting motion of the joint). An acute injury can also be caused by the stress of improperly lifting a heavy object.

However, most rotator cuff tears occur due to progressive degeneration (wear and tear) over time. The incidence of tears increases with aging. It is important to determine the cause of a rotator cuff tear since this impacts what treatment is recommended.

Treatments

  • Rest
  • Modified activity
  • Medications
  • Physical therapy
  • Steroid injections

Surgery: If conservative measures have not offered relief or if the tear is severe, surgery may be indicated. This is particularly the case for athletes or those who engage in repetitive overhead movement, since many tears do not heal on their own.

Shoulder Impingement

Shoulder impingement syndrome, which is also sometimes called “bursitis” or “tendinitis”, occurs with the repetitive compression (“impingement”) of the rotator cuff during movement. A thorough and careful examination is the best approach to a personalized diagnosis.

Causes

Shoulder impingement is also the result of repeated overhead activity involving the shoulder. It can also be caused by a shoulder injury. Finally, in some cases, there is no known cause of the condition.

Treatment

  • Rest (from overhead activity)
  • Ice
  • Medication
  • Physical therapy
  • Steroid injections 

Surgery: If other treatments do not provide results, surgery may be indicated to increase the space around the rotator cuff. The procedure, which can usually be done with minimally invasive arthroscopy, allows free movement without the compression or rubbing on the bone and the resulting pain.

Frozen Shoulder

Frozen shoulder, technically called adhesive capsulitis, is a condition causing stiffness, pain and immobility in the shoulder joint. It is due to a thickening and tightening of the shoulder joint capsule which restricts room for movement.

Causes

While the causes are usually unclear and cannot be identified, some people suffer frozen shoulder following a recent injury or fracture to the area which resulted in a need to immobilize the shoulder. In about 10 to 20 percent of cases, it can be caused by diabetes. Other medical problems may put people at risk for frozen shoulder (hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism, Parkinson’s and cardiac disease).

Treatments

  • Medications
  • Physical therapy
  • Steroid injections

Surgery is rarely required for frozen shoulder. Although recovery can take a long time (up to a couple of years), in the majority of people it resolves on its own with the use of nonsurgical treatments. In the event of surgery, manipulation under anesthesia and/or arthroscopy are performed to release the scar tissue.

If you’re having shoulder pain, contact us today to find out what’s wrong and how we can help.

NEOSM Collects for Cancer

Northeast Orthopedics and Sports Medicine (NEOSM) participated in a cancer awareness initiative on October 21, 2016. During this designated day, employees were permitted to dress down and wear something pink as long as they donated a minimum of $5.00.

NEOSM collected a grand total of $550, with all proceeds donated to the American Cancer Society in White Plains, NY.

November NEOSM Food Drive

Northeast Orthopedics and Sports Medicine (NEOSM) is proud to be hosting a food drive at all of our convenient locations. The drive will continue throughout the course of November with all donations going to People to People, Rockland County’s largest food pantry.

NEOSM is fully committed to helping friends and family in the community through this and other outreach programs. Click here for the complete list of requested items for those in need.

Come forward, and give back today!

NEOSM Gives Back: First Successful Drive for Local Schoolchildren

Northeast Orthopedics and Sports Medicine (NEOSM) banded together to provide $1000 worth of school supplies to East Ramapo children heading back to school this fall. 75 backpacks filled to the brim with supplies including scissors, pens and pencils were given to children of struggling families. A ceremony was held at NEOSM’s Nanuet location to present the donation to the superintendent.

“It’s an opportunity to give back to the community,” stated Carol Garabed, Director, NEOSM Human Resources. “We’re very excited about how this went.”