How to Care for Your Cast

We know it’s not the best news when you or your child need to be placed in a cast. But your orthopedic knows it’s the best course of action for your injury to heal properly. For however long it needs to remain on, we have some tips on how to make sure your time in your cast is successful.

When You First Get Your Cast

When first injured, the swelling that occurs can make the cast feel tight and uncomfortable. It’s important to take measures to treat the swelling to help the healing process by doing the following in the first 24-72 hours.

ELEVATE – Prop the injured arm or leg with support so that it is above the heart to allow fluid and blood to drain.

MOVEMENT – Move uninjured fingers and toes to prevent stiffness.

ICE – Apply ice to the injured area. Be sure to place loose ice in a plastic bag to keep the area dry and loosely wrap around the cast.

Caring for Your Cast

KEEP IT DRY – It’s important to keep the cast, and the injury, dry. When bathing or showering, cover the cast in two layers of plastic and seal with a band or duct tape. Avoid submerging in water, even when covered. Some injuries can be treated with a waterproof cast, so ask your doctor if yours is safe to get wet.

KEEP IT CLEAN – Dirt and sand particles can not only irritate the skin, but can hinder the healing process.

ITCHINESS – It’s common, but don’t try to relive any itches with an object or powders into the cast. If it continues and is unbearable, contact your doctor.

DON’T DIY – Don’t mess around with your cast. No pulling at the padding and no trimming of any rough edges without consulting your orthopedic. Never remove the cast on your own.

SPEAK UPIf you are experiencing any of the following symptoms, be sure to let your physician’s office know.

  • Increased pain or tightness
  • Numbness/tingling in the casted area
  • Burning or red/raw skin around the cast
  • Inability to move toes or fingers
  • Crack or soft spot on the cast

With proper care, you can ensure the time needed in a cast isn’t unnecessarily extended. And, as always, the specialists at Northeast Orthopedics and Sports Medicine are here to answer any questions and guide you through your treatment. We welcome your call any time. 

Backpack Safety Tips

School’s back in session. And we know kids can be weighed down, literally, with school work, leading to back and neck pain. The help minimize the risk of injury, the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons shares their guidelines to carry books and school work around safely.

But what can parents do to ensure kids are safe from injury?

  • First, ensure your child is following the guidelines above, and remind them throughout the school year.
  • Pay attention when your child picks up their backpack – are they struggling or look off balance? If so, help them adjust the items in their bag or remove some heavy items.
  • If your child is complaining of back pain, keep in mind that their backpack may be the cause. Should their discomfort continue, ask if keeping a second set of textbooks at home is an option or consider purchasing a rolling backpack.

With these tips, we wish all students a safe and successful school year from all of us at NEOSM!

Preventing Gardening Injuries

For most of us who enjoy gardening, it is a relaxing, safe hobby.  However, every year we see many people who are needlessly injured in their backyards. Nationally more than 400,000 gardening injuries are seen in the ER every year.

By: Dr. Doron Ilan

For most of us who enjoy gardening, it is a relaxing, safe hobby.  However, every year we see many people who are needlessly injured in their backyards. Nationally more than 400,000 gardening injuries are seen in the ER every year. Back injuries, hand lacerations/puncture wounds, infections, overuse tendinitis, bug bites, and heat exhaustion are some of the more common medical conditions seen in recreational gardeners. Here are a few tips to keep you safe this spring and summer.

  • Warm up: One of the most common mistakes is to head straight to the shed and start lifting heavy bags of mulch, soil, and equipment. This can lead to back sprains and muscle strains.  Instead, first, take a 5-10 brisk walk to warm up the muscles, loosen the joints and get the heart rate up a bit.
  • Wear gloves: This will prevent most thorn punctures, blisters, lacerations, and bug bites. It will also protect your skin from pesticides, bacteria, and fungus (often live in soil). A small cut can lead to a major infection. A light long sleeve shirt and long socks or pants can’t hurt either.  Don’t forget the sunscreen and a hat.
  • Hydrate: It is very easy to spend hours gardening without drinking. Bring a bottle of water outside with you and sip regularly
  • Rotate your tasks: Avoid overuse repetitive stress injuries by not spending more than 10-15 minutes in a row doing the same motion. Make sure your gardening activities are varied so that the same muscles are not used repetitively.
  • Use proper equipment
  • Check your skin for ticks after you finish gardening for the day. Lyme disease and other tick-borne infections are very common in our area.

Following these tips can help minimize your risk, but of course, if you do sustain an injury make sure to get medical attention as soon as possible.  Have a great spring and summer — and enjoy your gardening!

If you do encounter an orthopedic injury while gardening, contact us today to find out what’s wrong and how we can help.